Rhode Island’s inability to effectively enforce environmental law provides an economic incentive for less reputable businesses to evade regulations, thereby giving them an unfair competitive advantage. (Frank Carini/ecoRI News)

Rhode Island’s inability to effectively enforce environmental law provides an economic incentive for less reputable businesses to evade regulations, thereby giving them an unfair competitive advantage. (Frank Carini/ecoRI News)

 

By FRANK CARINI/ecoRI News staff

Since Smith Hill looks down on enforcement, the state agencies tasked with protecting the Ocean State’s natural resources are labeled anti-business and their resources are gutted. The environment and public health pay the price. Read More

 
Rhode Island Recycled Metals sits atop a former Superfund and current brownfield in Providence — polluted by polychlorinated biphenyls and capped with 12 inches of fill that some state officials and environmentalists are concerned is eroding. The waterfront business has been operating for nearly decade without all of the required permits. (Frank Carini/ecoRI News)

Rhode Island Recycled Metals sits atop a former Superfund and current brownfield in Providence — polluted by polychlorinated biphenyls and capped with 12 inches of fill that some state officials and environmentalists are concerned is eroding. The waterfront business has been operating for nearly decade without all of the required permits. (Frank Carini/ecoRI News)

 

By FRANK CARINI/ecoRI News staff

The state’s most recent environmental compliance report reads more like a pitch to invest in Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management stock than a document of enforcement actions. And both the report and the agency’s growing lack of transparency has environmentalists concerned. Read More

 
Managing the uses of and access to Rhode Island’s coastline is no easy task. It’s made more difficult when a citizen board lacking coastal knowledge and appointed by politicians ignores years of experience to overrule Coastal Resources Management Council staff on development projects. (Joanna Detz/ecoRI News)

Managing the uses of and access to Rhode Island’s coastline is no easy task. It’s made more difficult when a citizen board lacking coastal knowledge and appointed by politicians ignores years of experience to overrule Coastal Resources Management Council staff on development projects. (Joanna Detz/ecoRI News)

 

By TIM FAULKNER/ecoRI News staff

The conflict between protection and development is evident in the Coastal Resources Management Council’s own mission statement, which offers divergent directives: “Its primary responsibility is for the preservation, protection, development and where possible the restoration of the coastal areas of the state.” Read More

 

Short Reads: Series Summaries