"The need for tax shifting — lowering income taxes while raising taxes on environmentally destructive activities — in order to get the market to tell the truth has been widely endorsed by economists. The Economist (magazine) has recognized the advantage of environmental tax shifting and endorses it strongly: 'On environmental grounds, never mind energy security, America taxes gasoline too lightly. Better than a one-off increase, a politically more feasible idea, and desirable in its own terms, would be a long-term plan to shift taxes from incomes to emissions of carbon.'"

— Lester Brown, author

Don’t buy pre-cut, pre-washed and unsustainably packaged and sourced vegetables because it’s faster and easier. For example, buying a full stalk of celery — over a package of celery hearts — provides you with the leaves for seasoning soups, stuffings and salads.

Americans dump phones containing more than $60 million in gold and silver every year.

 

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Wednesday
Jul302014

Spraying for Mosquitoes a Risky Proposition

By JOYCE ROWLEY/ecoRI News contributor

Insecticides such as resmethrin, sumithrin and prallethrin are neurotoxins that act much like DDT — they interrupt nerve impulses. All three are known to be acutely toxic to fish and invertebrate aquatic species. Southern New England lobstermen believe a cocktail of insecticides is killing lobster larvae.<<Read more

Tuesday
Jul292014

Broken Portsmouth Wind Turbine Gets State Help

By TIM FAULKNER/ecoRI News staff

PROVIDENCE — Portsmouth High School's busted wind turbine, which Gov. Lincoln Chafee recently called “a symbol of embarrassment,” is getting some assistance from the state. The turbine has been out of service since 2012 because of a broken gearbox.<<Read more

Tuesday
Jul292014

Northeast Hurricane Modeling Outdated

By TIM FAULKNER/ecoRI News staff

Hurricanes are powered by warm water, and the predicted increase in ocean temperatures caused by climate change is expected to make hurricane season longer and the storms stronger in the years ahead. Numerous studies suggest the frequency of category 4 and 5 hurricanes are expected to increase by 81 percent.<<Read more

Sunday
Jul272014

Trio of Small Businesses Handles Torrent of E-Waste

By FRANK CARINI/ecoRI News staff

This year three Rhode Island companies are on pace to divert some 6 million pounds of e-waste from the state’s waste stream. But that 3,000 tons is just fraction of what is collecting dust in basements, attics and garages, being tossed illegally into Dumpsters, and being left on the curb for no one in particular.<<Read more

Friday
Jul252014

Fall River Switches to ‘Pay as You Throw’ Collection

By JOYCE ROWLEY/ecoRI News contributor

FALL RIVER, Mass. — The city joins 141 other Massachusetts PAYT municipalities in an effort to curb waste and increase recycling, both of which help prolong the life of landfills, reduce the need to burn waste, and save natural resources by removing more plastic, glass, metal and paper from the waste stream.<<Read more

Thursday
Jul242014

Where the Wild Things Once Were

By FRANK CARINI

Climate change, global warming, or whatever phrase you want to use to label our significant impact on the planet isn’t about biblical flooding, superstorms or shifting seasons. It’s about how much we value other living things and how much we really care about future generations.<<Read opinion

Wednesday
Jul232014

Young Campers Study Marsh to Gauge Ocean Health

By ecoRI News staff

WAQUOIT, Mass. — Campers from Waquoit Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve are getting firsthand marine science experience this summer as they head out to study plants and animals in the salt marsh. The budding scientists will learn to use high-tech mapping devices and field equipment to investigate the marsh’s overall health.<<Read more

Monday
Jul212014

Pull of Rhode Island’s Rivers is Powerful

By DAVID SMITH/ecoRI News contributor

It seems that there were three phases to the eight-day, 18-town, 101-mile-long Paddle Across Rhode Island and denial was not one of them. The four of us knew exactly what we were up against. Well, we didn’t know about the chafing, blisters and sunburns that awaited us, but then again, perhaps we didn’t want to know.<<Read more

Saturday
Jul192014

Natural-Gas Pipeline Expansion Draws Crowd

By TIM FAULKNER/ecoRI News staff

BURRILLVILLE. R.I. — Upgrading the pipeline compressor station in the northwest corner of Rhode Island is no small task. The proposed project requires several pieces of mammoth equipment and significant real estate. Critics say it also comes with major environmental risks.<<Read more

Tuesday
Jul152014

Meat-Eating Plants Losing Their Dining Room

By FRANK CARINI/ecoRI News staff

Like pollinators and amphibians, carnivorous plants are sentinels of environmental quality. One of the first things to disappear when a bog or wetland degrades is its population of carnivorous plants. Across the United States, including here in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, these habitats are being filled in and built upon.<<Read more