Nearly 40 million clams were harvested from Narragansett Bay in 2012, according to Rhode Island Sea Grant. In Rhode Island, commercial shellfishermen use a bull rake for harvesting clams. (R.I. Sea Grant)

Nearly 40 million clams were harvested from Narragansett Bay in 2012, according to Rhode Island Sea Grant. In Rhode Island, commercial shellfishermen use a bull rake for harvesting clams. (R.I. Sea Grant)

Ocean acidification could have a profound impact on marine life, and southern New England’s shellfish industry would be at risk.

Urban Cores are Already Feeling the Heat

Floodwaters from the Taunton River flooded the junction of Route 44 and Route 104 in Taunton, Mass., during the March 2010 floods. (NOAA)

Floodwaters from the Taunton River flooded the junction of Route 44 and Route 104 in Taunton, Mass., during the March 2010 floods. (NOAA)

Is southern New England adequately prepared for the impacts of the projected harsh weather ahead, especially on its most vulnerable residents: the sick, elderly, young and poor?

Climate Planning: The Heat Is On

Children are more susceptible to air pollution-related illness because their bodies are still developing. (istock)

Children are more susceptible to air pollution-related illness because their bodies are still developing. (istock)

Plenty of plans, studies and assessments address warmer and wetter weather in southern New England, but is the region truly prepared to help the most vulnerable of us?

An Uptick of Lyme Disease in Southern N.E.

Increased development is bringing people into more contact with tick-friendly habitat. (istock)

Increased development is bringing people into more contact with tick-friendly habitat. (istock)

Lyme disease is a growing health threat in southern New England, and climate change could be making it worse.

University of Rhode Island professor and director of the Center for Vector-Borne Disease Tom Mather says we're seeing more ticks in more places. But is the increase in tick population and tick-borne disease related to climate change?

WATCH: Fishermen on the Front Lines of Climate Change

The waters are changing off the coast of southern New England, and the fishing industry is feeling the impact.

There's Something Fishy About Climate Change

Black sea bass, which are sought both recreationally and commercially, are appearing in greater numbers off the coast of southern New England. (Tom Richardson/New England Boating)

Black sea bass, which are sought both recreationally and commercially, are appearing in greater numbers off the coast of southern New England. (Tom Richardson/New England Boating)

Warming waters and nitrogen overloads are conspiring to alter the composition of southern New England’s fisheries.

Three Sides to Every Fish Story

Fishing boats share space with recreational craft in Wickford Harbor. (Joanna Detz/ecoRI News)

Fishing boats share space with recreational craft in Wickford Harbor. (Joanna Detz/ecoRI News)

The relationship between the fishing industry, conservation groups and scientists is complicated. Climate change isn’t helping.